What is atrial fibrillation, and why should I take it seriously?

Tony AnnoPost written by Tony Anno, DNP, ACNP-BC CEPS, CCDS, FHRS, Nurse Practitioner, Cardiology Clinic

February is American Heart Month and the perfect time to increase your heart knowledge. The heart is an important organ that needs to function properly in order to maintain a healthy body. Dr. Tony Anno, Health Partnership Clinic’s Nurse Practitioner in the Cardiology Clinic explains Atrial Fibrillation, one type of heart arrhythmia.

Atrial fibrillation comes with many faces! It can be debilitating, mildly irritating or produce no symptoms at all. One can have palpitations or a fluttering feeling in your chest, chest pain, shortness of breath or extreme fatigue.

Understanding Atrial Fibrillation

Atrial fibrillation is an abnormal heart rhythm where the atrium beats chaotically and inefficiently. Usually, the heart chambers, the atrium, and the ventricles complement each other, with the atrium leading the way, followed by the ventricle to complete one heartbeat. The atrium is a thin-walled, low-pressure chamber compared to the ventricle and provides 20 percent of the overall contribution to the heartbeat.

Atrial fibrillation can be lone, where you only experience it for a single episode. It can be paroxysmal where it comes and goes. It can be persistent, where it comes and stays until you do something (medication or electrical shock) to make it go away. Or it can be permanent.

Atrial fibrillation in and of itself is not a life-threatening heart rhythm for most people. When you have a fast heart rhythm or rapid ventricular response for an extended period, it can cause the heart ventricles to become weakened or develop cardiomyopathy. And untreated atrial fibrillation is a major contributor to stroke, which is the fifth-leading cause of death in the United States.

Atrial fibrillation is diagnosed with an electrocardiogram. The 12-lead electrocardiogram is the standard; however, you may also be diagnosed with atrial fibrillation from a mobile or wearable monitor.

Risk Factors

Heart Health Month: Wear Red DaySeveral conditions make a person susceptible to developing atrial fibrillation:

  • Age
  • Obesity
  • Sleep apnea
  • Diabetes
  • Coronary artery or other diseases in your arteries
  • Diets high in caffeine or other stimulates
  • Thyroid conditions
  • High blood pressure

Once you have been diagnosed with atrial fibrillation, the decision to anticoagulate or use a blood thinner is discussed. The risk factors for stroke are:

  • Age over 65
  • Hypertension
  • Diabetes
  • Coronary artery disease or vascular disease
  • Weakened heart muscle or other structural heart diseases
  • Previous stroke or TIA

Heart Health MonthIf you have any two of the risk factors, you are considered a high-risk (2.2 percent annualized risk of stroke), with anticoagulation recommended. The good news is when taking a blood thinner, you have no greater risk of stroke than that of a person with similar characteristics without atrial fibrillation.

Your heart rate needs to be under 90 beats per minute most of the time, so medications will be used to achieve this, along with the blood thinner. This treatment strategy is referred to as “rate control and anticoagulation.”

You do not have to remain in this heart rhythm, though. Various methods are available to restore a “normal” or sinus rhythm. Sinus rhythm can be restored with a shock of the heart, or cardioversion, in conjunction with or without medication. The medications are called antiarrhythmic medications. Unfortunately, most of these medications have side effects that limit their use or keep them from being used indefinitely.

Finally, there are procedures called ablation that can cure or eliminate atrial fibrillation. The ablation procedure is accomplished by putting catheters in the left atrium and sometimes the right atrium and using radiofrequency heat to “cauterize” or very cold temperatures to “freeze” areas in the atrium to isolate or prevent the atrium from sustaining itself. These procedures are highly effective, especially if you have them early in the disease process.

With the identification and treatment of atrial fibrillation, you can preserve heart function and prevent strokes. If you think you have atrial fibrillation, get checked at your provider’s office.

About Tony Anno, DNP, ACNP-BC CEPS, CCDS, FHRS

Dr. Anno has been practicing nursing since 1987 and specializes in cardiology and electrophysiology.

At Health Partnership Clinic, Dr. Anno provides care to individuals with pacemakers and defibrillators that do not have access to traditional care. He also cares for patients with general cardiac problems such as atrial fibrillation and coronary artery disease.

Health Partnership Clinic, a federally qualified health center that serves adults and children is accepting new patients. Call 913-648-2266 to schedule an appointment today.

 

Health Partnership Staff Grateful for Community Generosity

By Debbie Sparks, Development and Marketing Manager

As 2020 draws to an end, the staff of Health Partnership Clinic remain grateful for the incredible outpouring of support from individuals and organizations throughout the pandemic. From donated masks, PPE and hand sanitizer to staff lunches, drink coupons and cookies—each thoughtful donation has helped to uplift our frontline staff.

Donation of White Jackets

Our friends at Aetna Better Health of Kansas graciously underwrote the cost of white jackets for all of our providers, including medical, behavioral health and dental, as a way to recognize their ongoing efforts.

Provider Jackets 1 Provider Jackets 2

Providing Food

UnitedHealthCare Community Plan provided a delicious breakfast from Panera for staff working one of our free COVID-19 testing events and those working the Saturday clinic as well as #HPCSTRONG t-shirts for staff and volunteers.

UHC Breakfast 1 UHC Breakfast 2

Handmade Masks

In the last few months, community members: Anne Simpson, Sylvia Kenner, Betty Gearheart and Cristil Singer from Mazuma Credit Union donated handmade masks for our patients and staff to wear in the community as it is mandated by several Kansas counties.

Mask Donation 1 Mask Donation 2

As we continue to navigate our “new normal,” we remain mission focused and ready to serve. The love that we feel from the community helps us to push through with the promise of brighter days ahead.

If you would like to make a monetary donation to Health Partnership Clinic:

Online: Visit our website at hpcks.org/give-back and click the Donate Now button.

Checks: Send a check to the following address:

Health Partnership Clinic
Attention Development
405 S. Clairborne Rd., Suite 2, Olathe, KS 66062

In-Kind Donations: If you are interested in making an in-kind donation of meals, masks or other appreciation items to HPC, please call Debbie Sparks at 913-433-7592.

Thank you for your continued support of Health Partnership!

(NOTE: The bold-faced names are new additions as first time or ongoing donors to our list.)

Aetna Better Health of Kansas (Provider Jackets)

Anne Simpson (Masks)

Anonymous

Charlie Hustle LLC

Chick-Fil-A

Culver’s

Davidson Promotional Products, Inc.

Direct Relief

Dominos

Amy Falk (Cookies/Paint)

Front Line Appreciation Group (FLAG KC)
Rick Krapes, Country Financial, Mickey The Cotton Candy Man and Jason’s Deli)

Florasource KC

Freddy’s Frozen Custard and Steakburgers

Betty Gearheart (Masks)

GE Johnson Construction Company

Global Birthing Home Foundation

Heart to Heart International

Hechler Orthodontics

Hibba Haider, MD

Home Depot

Hy-Vee

Indigo Wild

J. Rieger & Co.

Jersey Mikes Subs

Kansas City Chinese American Association

Kansas Gas Service (Toni’s Lunch)

Sylvia Kenner (Masks)

Krispy Kreme

LRO Studios-Michelle and Rachel Schneider (Masks)

Lucia Jones Herrera, MSN, RN/UnitedHealthcare (Masks)

Marco Pizza

Mazuma Credit Union (Masks)

Metro Lutheran Ministries

Mickey The Cotton Candy Man

Tracey Mikes (Masks)

Olathe Chamber of Commerce
(Park Street Pastry, Strips, Olathe Downtown Diner, Tropical Smoothie Café, Chapala Mexican Restaurant, Doc Greens)

Olathe Rotary Club

Olathe School District

Pizza Village

Pulley Wholesale Florist

QuikTrip

Restless Spirits Distilling

Catherine Rice (Paint/Snacks)

Celia Ruiz-UnitedHealthcare (Masks)

Sam’s Club

Shawnee Mission School District

Simple Simon’s Pizza

Smoothie King

Sonic

The National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NAFC)

Union Horse Distilling Company

UnitedHealthcare Community Plan
(Staff, Volunteer, Board T-shirts/Masks/Breakfast from Panera)

Dental Director receives prestigious Oral Health Kansas Award

By Catherine Rice, Vice President of Marketing/Outreach

Emily DayEmily C. Day, DDS, of Olathe, Kan., Dental Director for Health Partnership Clinic (HPC), recently received the Outstanding Dentist Award from Oral Health Kansas. Oral Health Kansas is the statewide advocacy organization dedicated to promoting the importance of lifelong dental health by shaping policy and educating the public, so Kansans know that all mouths matter. The award was presented virtually during its Oral Health Conference on Oct. 30 and Nov. 6.

Outstanding Dentist Award from Oral Health Kansas

Each year Oral Health Kansas recognizes outstanding individuals and organizations who contribute significantly to improving the oral health of all Kansans and are awarded the Excellence in Oral Health Award. “Oral Health Kansas recognizes outstanding individuals and organizations who contribute significantly to improving the oral health of all Kansans. Dr. Emily Day certainly personifies those contributions,” says Tanya Dorf Brunner, Executive Director for Oral Health Kansas.

According to Amy Falk, Health Partnership’s CEO, Dr. Day has made a sustainable impact to the clinic, exemplifies the mission of the clinic and has positively impacted the people of Kansas. “It’s a wonderful tribute to Dr. Day’s many achievements and her steady presence here at HPC. The staff, board and patients join in congratulating her on this award.”

Dr. Day Group Pic

During the COVID-19 Pandemic, Dr. Day has shown exceptional leadership. She advocated for capital improvements for the Dental department to protect patients and staff. This included numerous hours researching the proper air purification units that would improve the air exchange rate in the Dental clinic to help mitigate virus transmission, procurement of chairside extraoral suction devices to minimize the aerosols generated by dental procedures and the addition of more intraoral suction devices to further diminish aerosol production.

Dr. Day has been our Dental Director since 2019

Dr. Day with Dr. NaderDr. Day, specialty trained in pediatric dentistry at Children’s Mercy Hospital and Clinics, Kansas City, Mo., has served as the clinic’s Dental Director since 2019. Since beginning her career in 2002, she has devoted herself to providing high quality oral health care to area children in the state of Kansas and abroad. Today she advocates and ensures affordable and accessible dental homes to those who are low income or underinsured, particularly our youngest Kansans. She brings an immense amount of knowledge and best practices from a private practice perspective as well as years working and volunteering in dental outreach.

“Since joining the clinic, I’ve developed and implemented protocols and policies to protect patients and staff, which included a procedural risk analysis based on aerosol generation, COVID-19 pre-procedural modifications, COVID-19 procedural modifications, operatory terminal cleaning procedures and a dental emergency triage worksheet to gather information over the phone prior to the appointment,” Dr. Day says.

Thoughts from Dr. Mourad

“Although Dr. Day has only been with the clinic for 14 short months, she has made extraordinary progress,” says Wael S. Mourad, MD, the clinic’s Chief Health Officer. “This has impacted operations, culture and best practices. She is passionate about establishing relationships with families and young patients by offering a warm, welcoming and safe environment and listening and being responsive to their needs. Beyond this and during times of transition, Dr. Day maintains clear communications and leads by example. She is an excellent ambassador of the clinic ensuring her professional colleagues and personal friends are aware of the mission of the clinic.”

Dr. Mourad adds, “The Dental department was without a director for several months when Dr. Day joined the clinic. She was quick to recognize an environment that was originally resistant to change but took her time empathizing with staff and learning how best to earn their trust. Her high standards of care, both for dentistry and for the care of people, helped develop a culture where the staff is proud to come to work and comfortable expressing concerns, all for the betterment of our patients.”

Dr. Day with HPC group

Private Practice Experience

Her private practice experience is an invaluable resource for the Dental department. Dr. Day implemented a comprehensive medical/dental history into the patient visit and developed a workflow in the electronic health record to ensure this was updated annually. She has revised multiple treatment consent forms to maintain best practices and simplify content for understanding.

“Dr. Day brings a strong sense of standardization not only to the dental area, but to the entire clinic, regarding sterilization processing and monitoring, infection control and inventory management,” Dr. Mourad adds.

“I would not be here today without some very important people in my life,” Dr. Day reflects. “I want to thank my dental team, senior leaders and my family for all their support! This award is an exceptional honor.”

Outside the Clinic

Outside the clinic, Dr. Day, who is a wife and mother of two daughters, is actively involved in her church and cochairs the Strategic Planning Committee of the Ladies of Peace Board. She is a founding and current member of this women’s ministry that provides, social, spiritual and service to the parish and community through sisterhood.

Congratulations Dr. Day!

Vaccines Vs. Pandemic: Don’t delay experts say.

Mayra Lemus

Mayra Lemus, NRCMA, Medical Assistant

By Mayra Lemus, NRCMA, Medical Assistant, Health Partnership Clinic

Back-to-school season is here. 2020 has impacted people’s lives in different aspects. In an effort to prevent the spread of COVID-19, stay-at-home orders and preventive measures were put in place, thus leading to a decrease in routine preventable medical services such as well child exams and routine vaccines for children.

Should my child still get routine vaccines during the COVID-19 pandemic?

Yes! It is essential that routine vaccines are kept current to reduce vaccine-preventable disease outbreaks. This can prevent unnecessary hospitalizations and medical visits creating a strain on the health care system. It is important that there is communication to parents and caregivers about the value of immunizations. Vaccinations save lives!

With the pandemic, routine services have been put on the back burner for many families. Therefore, it is important that procedures and safety guidelines within medical facilities are communicated to ease the concerns of the community. At Health Partnership Clinic, we have instituted several protocols to ensure our “well” patients are protected to the best of our abilities. One way is to require all individuals entering the clinic to wear masks. Another is to separate well and sick patients.

“Thanks to vaccines, most of these diseases have become rare in the United States,” says Dr. Nancy Messonnier, Director of the National Center for Immunization and Respiratory Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). “But many still exist here, and they can make children very sick, leading to many days of missed school, missed work for parents and even hospitalization and death.”

Back to School

Back to School and ImmunizationRoutine physicals and vaccines play a huge part in the back-to-school process for school districts. It’s a good practice for parents and caregivers to know their school’s protocols and procedures. Most schools have requirements and guidelines for children and vaccines before enrolling in order to protect the health of their students and their community.

Examples include:

  • Children, four to six years of age, are due for boosters of vaccines:
    • DTaP (diphtheria, tetanus, and pertussis)
    • polio
    • varicella
    • MMR (measles, mumps, and rubella).
  • Older children, like pre-teens and teens, need:
    • Tdap (tetanus, diphtheria and pertussis)
    • HPV (human papillomavirus)
    • MenACWY (meningococcal conjugate virus) vaccines.
  • Yearly flu vaccines are recommended for all children six months and older. With COVID-19 cases on the rise, it is crucial for individuals (adults and children) to receive their flu vaccine this flu season.

ImmunizationHealth departments all over the United States monitor vaccination coverage to understand how well communities are being protected from vaccine-preventable diseases. The collaboration and integration of public health and primary care leverages and strengthens the capabilities of each to deliver critical services.

Parents and caregivers can find out more about the recommended immunization schedule for 2020 here.

Also check out www.cdc.gov for more important updates. Your local health department websites also contain great information on how to get vaccinated safely during this pandemic.

Always remember every vaccine administered is a step away from a disease outbreak!

We hope you enjoyed this post!

Health Partnership offers a Pediatric Walk-In clinic at its Olathe campus (407 S. Clairborne Rd., Ste. 104) Monday-Friday from 7:30 a.m. to Noon. Stop by for trusted, convenient pediatric medical treatment for minor illnesses and injuries to children under 18 years old. Immunizations and school physicals are also given. The clinic is open to HPC patients and the community. Discounted medical care is available and commercial insurance and KanCare/Medicaid are accepted. To learn more, call 913-648-2266.

Nurse Practitioner discovers her calling… providing women’s health services.

Elizabeth Lewis

Elizabeth Lewis, WHNP-BC, MSN, BSN, RN
Women’s Health Nurse Practitioner

As a child, Elizabeth Lewis remembers her sister being born with a heart defect and herself faced with health challenges that required frequent visits to her pediatrician, Dr. Naime. These first-hand experiences propelled her toward a health care career to take care of people. She’s accomplished that goal and much more. Today, Elizabeth is the Women’s Health Nurse practitioner at Health Partnership Clinic, a federally qualified health center in Olathe, Kan. She joined the clinic in 2019 and has practiced nursing since 2006.

She recently earned a Master of Public Administration with an emphasis in Healthcare Administration from the UMKC Henry W. Bloch School of Management. But her medical educational journey began in high school when she started taking science and health classes. “I always enjoyed science and psychology classes,” she says. “I also started volunteering at hospitals and with children because I felt this was my calling—even as a teenager.” She later volunteered at the Metropolitan Organization to Counter Sexual Assault (MOCSA).

Education

She followed that calling and attended the University of Missouri-Kansas City earning a Bachelor of Science in Nursing, a Bachelor of Arts in Psychology with a minor in Family Studies and eventually a Master of Science in Nursing-Women’s Health Track. Life-long learning has been a huge focus for her.

Her nursing experience spans from inpatient care, health departments, community health centers and as a sexual assault examiner for several hospitals. But it was working in Truman Medical Center’s Labor and Delivery unit that she knew she wanted to focus on women’s health, particularly serving women with limited resources.

“I really believe that women who have fewer resources deserve the most excellent care that can be provided,” she says. “Women who have economic and social disadvantages have special needs, and I wanted to be of service to them. What I’ve learned is that you must take the person who comes through your door and meet them where they are at. That’s what I try to do at each patient visit.”

Patients

Elizabeth Lewis with family at her graduationLewis says patients are her favorite part of the job. “As a medical provider, I have a huge responsibility to my patients. They trust me with their most protected self, and it’s important they feel open to communicate their needs and trust that I’ll take care of them no matter what.”

As a Women’s Health practitioner, Elizabeth deals with all aspects of whole women care—everything from menarche (from the first menstrual cycle) to menopause. In addition, she treats men for reproductive health issues and is experienced with transgender medicine.

“Women have many unique health concerns including menstrual cycles, pregnancy, birth control and menopause,” she notes. “There are some health issues that affect only women, but many diseases which affect men and women, affect women differently which requires listening to what each patient needs. The key is listening.”

“I am very passionate about listening to patients’ health stories and meeting them where they are. I want to provide the best care possible for the whole person – physical, psychological and spiritual.”

Prenatal Services

Currently, she is lending her expertise to help develop prenatal services for HPC.

“Ms. Lewis has been an outstanding addition to the medical staff here at Health Partnership,” notes Wael S. Mourad, MD, MHCM, FAAFP, Chief Health Officer and Family Physician. “She is mission driven, always seeks to continue improve and has high expectations of herself and others. The high level of quality that she brings to every patient visit is exactly what we want and need for our patients.”

Elizabeth resides in Overland Park, Kan. with her husband and two children. She enjoys spending time with her family and friends, drinking coffee, traveling and reading.

Health Partnership grateful for support during COVID-19

Health Partnership Clinic: Thank you for your support during the pandemic!

By Catherine Rice, Vice President of Marketing/Outreach

On Fridays, our employees and volunteers are now sporting a new look. Staff are wearing their very cool T-shirts with a heart graphic depicting the words #HPCSTRONG. That has been our rallying call since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic. The t-shirts were underwritten by UnitedHealthcare Community Plan to thank our frontline staff for all their efforts. Board members also received the shirts.

Our friends at Aetna Better Health of Kansas is underwriting the cost of white jackets for all our providers, including medical, behavioral health and dental, as their way to recognize their ongoing efforts. The jackets will be branded with the clinic’s logo and personalized. Another example of appreciation was from our very own CEO Amy Falk who brought in deliciously designed iced sugar cookies with our #HPCSTRONG wording. Amy and the other members of the Senior Leadership Team recognize and appreciate the tremendous sacrifices the staff members are making to serve our patients and community.

Health Partnership Clinic: Thank you for your support during the pandemic!

Thank you for your support!

Since the beginning of the pandemic, we have been lucky to receive countless in-kind donations—from complimentary breakfast and lunches to masks, hand sanitizer and gift items, as well as monetary donations. To date, more than 50 individuals, businesses and organizations have donated to the health center. It has been overwhelming and humbling to see the outreach of support!

As we embrace a “new normal,” remain resilient and mission focused, we will fondly remember those generous donors throughout the days and weeks to come which will help keep us #HPCSTRONG!

Health Partnership Clinic: Thank you for your support during the pandemic!

The bold-faced names are new additions as first time or ongoing donors to our list.

Aetna (Provider Jackets)

Anonymous

Charlie Hustle LLC

Chick-fil-A

Culver’s

Davidson Promotional Products

Direct Relief

Dominos

Health Partnership Clinic: Thank you for your support during the pandemic!Amy Falk (Cookies/Paint)

Front Line Appreciation Group (FLAG KC) – Rick Krapes, Country Financial, Mickey the Cotton Candy Man and Jason’s Deli

FlorasourceKC

Freddy’s Frozen Custard and Steak Burgers

Betty Gearheart (Masks)

GE Johnson Construction Company

Global Birthing Home Foundation

Heart to Heart International

Hibba Haider, MD

Home Depot

Hy-Vee

Indigo Wild

Rieger & Co.

Jersey Mike’s Subs

Kansas City Chinese American Association

Kansas Gas Service (Toni’s Lunch)

Sylvia Kenner (Masks)

Krispy Kreme

LRO Studios- Michelle and Rachel Schneider (Masks)

Lucia Jones Herrera, MSN, RN/UnitedHealthcare (Masks)

Marco Pizza

Metro Lutheran Ministries

Mickey The Cotton Candy Man

Tracey Mikes (Masks)

Olathe Chamber of Commerce (Park Street Pastry, Strips, Olathe Downtown Diner, Tropical Smoothie Café, Chapala Mexican Restaurant, Doc Greens)

Olathe Rotary Club

Olathe School District

Pizza Village

Pulley Wholesale Florist

QuikTrip

Restless Spirits Distilling

Catherine Rice (Paint/Snacks)

Celia Ruiz-UnitedHealthcare (Masks)

Sam’s Club

Shawnee Mission School District

Simple Simon’s Pizza

Smoothie King

Sonic

The National Association of Free and Charitable Clinics (NAFC)

Union Horse Distilling Company

UnitedHealthcare Community Plan (Staff, Volunteer, Board T-shirts/Masks)

(List updated June 22, 2020)

If you are interested in donating meals or other staff appreciation items to HPC, call me at 913-730-3680. For monetary donations, visit us at https://hpcks.org/give-back/.

Thanks to our Dental Hygienists and Administrative Professionals!

Recognizing our team during National Dental Hygienists Week starting April 10th, and Admin Day on April 22nd. We appreciate our team!

February is American Heart Month

By Catherine Rice, Vice President of Marketing/Outreach

Raise awareness about heart health and urge those around you to prevent heart disease!

Heart disease is the leading cause of death for both men and women. To prevent heart disease and increase awareness of its effects, Health Partnership Clinic is proudly participating in American Heart Month. Every year, one in four deaths are caused by heart disease.

The good news? Heart disease can often be prevented when people make healthy choices and manage their health conditions. Communities, health professionals, and families can work together to create opportunities for people to make healthier choices.

The clinic is bringing awareness by wearing red on Wear Red Day on Friday, Feb. 7. Heart healthy information will also be available.

2020 Wear Red Day is February 7th

You can make healthy changes to lower your risk of developing heart disease. Controlling and preventing risk factors is also important for people who already have heart disease. Wael S. Mourad, MD, MHCM, FAAFP, Health Partnership’s Chief Health Officer, offers the following ways to lower your risk:

  • Watch your weight.
  • Quit smoking and stay away from secondhand smoke.
  • Control your cholesterol and blood pressure.
  • If you drink alcohol, drink only in moderation.
  • Manage stress.
  • Get active and eat healthy.

2020 Wear Red Day is February 7thAm I at risk for heart disease?

 Everyone is at risk for heart disease. But you are at higher risk for heart disease if you:

  • Have high cholesterol or high blood pressure.
  • Are overweight or obese.
  • Don’t get enough physical activity.
  • Don’t eat a healthy diet.

Your age and family history also affect your risk for heart disease.

Your risk is higher if:

  • You are a woman over age 55.
  • You are a man over age 45.
  • Your father or brother had heart disease before age 55.
  • Your mother or sister had heart disease before age 65.

For more information, visit https://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth.

Health Partnership remembers Veterans Day, November 11th.

Health Partnership Clinic: Remembering Veterans DayIn tribute to the men and women who have served or are currently serving in our nations’ armed forces, HPC will host an informational table at the Olathe clinic with resources, refreshments and giveaways on Monday, Nov. 11, during regular clinic hours. Information and cookies will be available at our other sites for patients and staff.

Veteran Patients

“Based on our records, nearly 50 patients have identified as veterans,” says Catherine Rice, Vice President of Marketing and Outreach. “Each veteran will receive a card thanking them for their service with an invitation to stop by the Olathe clinic on Nov. 11 for treats and information.”

In addition, we honor Lee Champion, RN, Clinical Director, who is our only veteran staff member. “Lee served in the U.S. Navy from 1981-88, and we thank her for defending our country so that we may enjoy the many freedoms we have today.”

Olathe Clinic Returns to Extended Hours

Improving Access to CareHealth Partnership Clinic’s Olathe site now offers extended hours, including the first and third Saturdays of the month. The Olathe site is open Monday-Thursday from 7 a.m. to 8 p.m. and Friday from 7 a.m. to 6:30 p.m. The first and third Saturday of each month, the clinic is open from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m.

Hours will remain the same at the Shawnee Mission, Ottawa and Paola locations, Monday-Friday from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m.

The Olathe clinic also offers same day appointments during the work week and on Saturdays for patients of all ages. Same day scheduling means that new or established adult and pediatric patients can access acute or chronic care through walk in or same day appointment. Once the slots are filed for the day, the clinic will be considered full.

Dr. Wael MouradAccording to Wael S. Mourad, MD, MHCM, FAAFP, Chief Health Officer, over the last several months much work has been focused on strengthening our internal processes, standardizing patient care and tweaking staffing models.

“Providing access to quality and affordable health care is a cornerstone of our mission,” Dr. Mourad adds. “We work in a Community Health Center, and we take care of the most vulnerable people in society. In everything we do, we continue to strive to be patient centered.”